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World’s largest dam removal unleashes U.S. river

The Elwha River flows into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, carrying sediment once trapped behind dams. Credit: Elaine Thompson/AP

The Elwha River flows into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, carrying sediment once trapped behind dams. Credit: Elaine Thompson/AP

Yesterday, on a remote stretch of the Elwha River in northwestern Washington state, a demolition crew hired by the National Park Service detonated a battery of explosives within the remaining section of the Glines Canyon Dam. The blasts destroyed the last 30 feet of the 210-foot-high dam and will signal the culmination of the largest dam-removal project in the world.

In Asia, Africa, and South America, large hydroelectric dams are still being built, as they once were in the United States, to power economic development, with the added argument now that the electricity they provide is free of greenhouse gas emissions. But while the U.S. still benefits from the large dams it built in the 20th century, there’s a growing recognition that in some cases, at least, dambuilding went too far—and the Elwha River is a symbol of that.

The removal of the Glines Canyon Dam and the Elwha Dam, a smaller downstream dam, began in late 2011. Three years later, salmon are migrating past the former dam sites, trees and shrubs are sprouting in the drained reservoir beds, and sediment once trapped behind the dams is rebuilding beaches at the Elwha’s outlet to the sea. For many, the recovery is the realization of what once seemed a far-fetched fantasy.

“Thirty years ago, when I was in law school in the Pacific Northwest, removing the dams from the Elwha River was seen as a crazy, wild-eyed idea,” says Bob Irvin, president and CEO of the conservation group American Rivers. “Now dam removal is an accepted way to restore a river. It’s become a mainstream idea.”


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