Top nav

James River Water Levels

Westham Gauge
Gauge Height: 3.71'
Flow: 1550 cfps

Trail Conditions: Richmond

@rvatrailreport

Todays Tides: Richmond Locks

High Tide: 2:12pm
Low Tide: 9:12pm

Twitter Feed @RichmondOutside

Instagram Feed @RichmondOutside

Instagram
  • Cool newish sign at the north entrance to the Bellehellip
  • New hardware atop Belle Isle will at least make ithellip
  • Ralph White minced no words when it came to jrpshellip
  • Friend of the program rvatrees gets ready to climb ahellip
  • Saw evidence of the growing controversy surrounding laruspark on ahellip
  • The pawpaws are in along buttermilktrail They should ripen inhellip
  • If you dont follow jamesriverpark you should The incomparable sandysdadhellip
  • Wish I could have gotten closer to this fella tohellip
  • Riding the wissahickon in philly is a blast every timehellip
  • The richmondoutside road trip arrived on the potomacriver in timehellip
  • Repost from Richmond fly fishing guide knotthereelworld  Floating thehellip
  • Met a new friend on the pooploop recently Taciturn fellowhellip

Wildlife populations declined by half since 1970

The World Wildlife Fund says the report is a wake-up call for humans, who are overwhelmingly responsible for wildlife decline. Credit: kapyos/Thinkstock

The World Wildlife Fund says the report is a wake-up call for humans, who are overwhelmingly responsible for wildlife decline. Credit: kapyos/Thinkstock

The earth’s wildlife population has been cut in half since 1970, according to the World Wildlife Fund’s 2014 Living Planet Report, released Tuesday.

The authors of the study blamed human intervention, including habitat loss, hunting, and fishing. The report also considered climate change a factor, but its influence was harder to quantify.

The study measured 10,000 populations of about 3,000 animal species to create an index of the world’s fish, birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. Some populations have remained stable, but they were outweighed by the declines—especially among freshwater species.

Human activity is consuming the planet’s resources faster than they can regenerate, the study authors concluded. “For now, we can cut trees faster than they mature, harvest more fish than the oceans can replenish, or emit more carbon into the atmosphere than the forests and oceans can absorb,” says the report. “The sum of all human demands no longer fits within what nature can renew.”


Comments