James River Water Levels

Westham Gauge
Gauge Height: 4.53'
Flow: 3460 cfps

Trail Conditions: Richmond


Todays Tides: Richmond Locks

High Tide: 6:48am
Low Tide: 2:18pm

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Video: Snake eats crocodile!

A python like this one ate a crocodile.

A python like this one ate a crocodile.

The Australian crocodile never had a chance.

During a five-hour battle in northern Queensland, a snake wrestled, constricted, and finally ate a crocodile on Sunday. The 10-foot-long serpent—thought to be an enormous water python—wrapped itself around the croc as the two fought in the water.

The snake then dragged its prey to land and began to consume it—whole. The meal lasted only about 15 minutes.

“It was amazing,” Tiffany Corlis, a local author who saw the fight, told the BBC. “We saw the snake … roll the crocodile around to get a better grip and coil its body around the crocodile’s legs to hold it tight. … After the crocodile had died, the snake uncoiled itself, came around to the front, and started to eat the crocodile, face first.”

Some of the world’s most dangerous snakes live in Queensland, as do saltwater crocodiles. According to snake expert Bryan Fry, these face-offs between the two predators aren’t uncommon.

“Crocs are more dangerous to catch [than rodents], but easier to sneak up on,” he told the Brisbane Times. “Up in Kakadu, for example, they feed heavily on small rodents, but that’s not to say they won’t take the crocs as well.”