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James River Water Levels

Westham Gauge
Gauge Height: 5.40'
Flow: 6110 cfps
Above 5' life jacket required

Trail Conditions: Richmond

James River Park System trails are ready for your two wheels
Thursday, June 22, 2017

Todays Tides: Richmond Locks

High Tide: 3:48am
Low Tide: 11:18am

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  • Repost from Richmond fly fishing guide knotthereelworld  Floating thehellip
  • Met a new friend on the pooploop recently Taciturn fellowhellip
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  • Caught this screenshot abt 30 min ago on the rvaospreycamhellip
  • Dont forget the vaflyfishingfestival this weekend in Doswell Va! Theyvehellip
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  • That right there is an osprey egg Pretty gorgeous no?hellip
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Video: Bear Learns How to Shower

First watch this, then watch that: http://www.offgridquest.com/fun/watch-this-bulldog-chase-these-bears-in-

Posted by Amazing to See on Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Bears usually don’t give much thought to personal hygiene. Although they love to take care of a good itch from time to time, you won’t often see bears rushing down to the river to get a bath in. That’s why this video of bear seemingly washing itself is so fascinating—it even made sure to clean behind the ears!

That’s not to say that bears are incapable of grooming themselves. These large, furry predators typically make do with a good rub against trees or boulders, and the occasional dip in a river. According to experts, polar bears are actually among the cleanest of bears simply because matted, dirty fur makes for a poor insulator. Since they are close to water, polar bears will often take 15-minute baths during which they try to remove food particles, dirt, and other messy materials from their fur. Brown and black bears do the same, but less frequently.

Some bears have even be spotted using rocks or other objects to exfoliate themselves. This bruin though, has found a much better way to get clean.


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