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Posted In: Environment

Spaces Available for ‘Va. Master Naturalist’ Training Classes

Andy Thompson

@richmondoutside
October 19, 2017 9:36am

Yesterday local bird lover Bert Browning brought us the story of the area’s newest bluebird nest box trail. Browning is a recent graduate of the Pocahontas Chapter of the Virginia Master Naturalist program, and his story reminds us that every day, all over the area, nature lovers are working to protect and grow Central Va.’s  wildlife and natural resources.

With that in mind, the Pocahontas Chapter of the Virginia Master Naturalist program is now accepting a limited number of applications for the 2018 Basic Training Class from now until October 31 or whenever
the class is filled. Training will be held from early January to the end of April. There will be a fee of $125 to cover the instruction costs.

The Virginia Master Naturalist Program is a statewide corps of volunteers providing education, outreach, and service dedicated to the management of natural resources and natural areas within their communities.  The Pocahontas Chapter conducts projects primarily in Chesterfield County.

Master Naturalists go through 40 hours of basic training and field trips. The curriculum includes: basic ecology, geology, herpetology, botany, ornithology, dendrology, native species, entomology, mammalogy, ichthyology and more. The Classes will typically be held on Tuesday evenings at:

Pocahontas State Park
10301 State Park Rd.
Chesterfield, VA 23832-6355.

For more information, contact Lesha Berkel at pocahontasvmn@gmail.com.


About Andy Thompson

I was the Outdoors Columnist at the Times-Dispatch from 2007 to 2013, writing twice a week about mountain biking, fishing, hunting, paddling and much more. I live a 1/4 mile from the James River, close enough to see bald eagles soaring over my house on their way to find a meal. Pretty cool, eh?


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