James River Water Levels

Westham Gauge
Gauge Height: 9.51'
Flow: 25500 cfps

Trail Conditions: Richmond

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  • Rain overnight has trails soaked and there is likely more coming later today. Pocahontas trails are closed but fireroads are open.

Todays Tides: Richmond Locks

High Tide: 5:30pm
Low Tide: 12:00pm

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Posted In: Birding

Bald eagle releases planned nearby

@richmondoutside
July 30, 2012 2:43pm

The Wildlife Center of Virginia is planning back-to-back bald eagle releases this week, one of which is just a short drive for Richmonders. If you’ve never been to a bald eagle release, they’re really neat events. Young kids, esepcially, seem to get a kick out of it. On Wednesday, August 1, and again on Thursday, August 2, the Center plans to release juvenile bald eagles that have been treated at the Center since May. Both of these releases will be open to the public.

The two bald eagles to be released are:

Bald Eagle #12-0992. This young eagle was found on the ground in Washington D.C. on May 24. Admitted to the Wildlife Center the following day, the eagle was thin and dehydrated. Bald Eagle #12-0992 will be released on Wednesday, August 1 at 11:00 a.m. at Mason Neck State Park in Fairfax County. Those attending the release should meet at the Park Visitor’s Center at 11:00 a.m.

Bald Eagle #12-0744. Admitted on May 10, this Bald Eagle was rescued by a DGIF biologist from the Hog Island Wildlife Management Area in Surry County, Virginia. The eagle was thin and initial blood work suggested an infection. The release of Bald Eagle #12-0744 will be on Thursday, August 2 at 10:30 a.m. at Berkeley Plantation near Richmond. Release site directions can be found here.

Both of these releases are open to the public. To assist The Wildlife Center with a head count, please email ksluiter@wildlifecenter.org if you plan on attending one, or both, releases!


About Andy Thompson

I was the Outdoors Columnist at the Times-Dispatch from 2007 to 2013, writing twice a week about mountain biking, fishing, hunting, paddling and much more. I live a 1/4 mile from the James River, close enough to see bald eagles soaring over my house on their way to find a meal. Pretty cool, eh?


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